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American Flyers Flight School September Aviation Newsletter

A Journey of a Thousand Miles…
By Joe La Valle

Aspiring aviator Adrien Gauthier, 17, hails from the town of Lamorlaye on the outskirts of Paris and has taken not one, but many, large steps toward realizing his ambitions.

Adrien had been exposed to aviation for nearly all his life as his father, also a pilot, would often take him on local flights and offered him the opportunity to fly; since then, it has become Adrien’s dream.

With initial training opportunities relatively limited in France, Adrien made the trip to the U.S. in order to earn his private pilot certificate. As of this interview, Adrien is only a few days away from his check ride, and then it’s back to France to begin the new school term.

With initial training opportunities relatively limited in France, Adrien made the trip to the U.S. in order to earn his private pilot certificate. As of this interview, Adrien is only a few days away from his check ride, and then it’s back to France to begin the new school term.

Adrien's ultimate goal is to fly the Dassault Rafale for France’s air force. Adrien says that the Rafale is his favorite, but it will require a lot of school. Right now, Adrien will be done with his university in 2009, and is looking at three years for military pilot training, and then a possible five more at a military university if he decides to pursue a long-term career as a military officer. This decision will have to come quick though, he must commit to either course by the time he is eighteen.

When he is not flying, Adrien enjoys tennis, piano and a newfound love of golf.

Aviation training flight student.

Destinations
By Joe La Valle

As the school year begins, students of all ages are getting ready to return to a life of learning. However, you don’t have to be a student to appreciate the exciting and informative exhibits and displays the nation’s aviation museums have to offer.

For a full day of aviation history and fun, the “Largest Aerospace Museum in Illinois” is less than one hundred miles south of Chicago. Located at Rantoul National Airport (TIP), the Octave Chanute Aerospace Museum is sure to provide the whole family with educational excitement. The mission of this former US Air Force Base is to “collect, preserve and exhibit aviation and aerospace artifacts.” This 126,000 sq.ft. facility is open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, on Sunday from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm and features amenities such as a gift shop, snack bar and a Children’s Discovery Room.

It is not just a wide array of military aircraft on display, but visitors can also experience life on an Air Force Base inside a preserved barracks and mess hall. Also on display are photographic records of pastime activities on the base, as well as a history of the uniforms worn by the men and women who served there. Additional exhibits include aerospace ground equipment, flight simulators, engines and restored Minuteman ICMB training silos. When you’re done, be sure to tour the Military Aviation Hall of Fame. No matter your age or interests, Octave Chanute Aerospace Museum is sure to entertain and inform with its rich variety of history.


Career Aviator Well on His Way
By Joe La Valle

With his commercial check ride only days away, Mike Babli is one step closer to his goal of flying for the regional airlines, and then for a major airline. The prospect of an aviation career is something that has always interested Mike, and now he is even getting his family involved.

Originally from San Jose, California, Mike began flight training with a local flying club called Squadron Two, eventually earning his private pilot license. He decided to make the move out to the Midwest to complete his fight training. Recalling his decision, Mike said that he “originally was going to stay just for the training, but now I just want to stay.” He added that the opportunity for flying in IMC conditions was better on the plains and that out here he could really experience weather unlike anything he had done back in California.

Currently, Mike is a year away from completing his college coursework in the field of aviation science. His flight training is also earning him college credit; with every successful written and flight test, he comes closer to graduating.

When he is not in training, Mike enjoys taking his father, brothers and friends flying. Very recently, his younger brother, Mustafa, has decided to follow his big brother and pursue a flying career as well.

Flight traning student's aviation dreams.

First Impressions Mean a Lot
By David Menconi National Chief Flight Instructor

Everyone knows that you only have one chance to make a good first impression. Whether you’re interviewing for a job or trying to demonstrate to an examiner that you qualify for a certificate or rating, first impressions are important.

Everyone knows that you only have one chance to make a good first impression. Whether you’re interviewing for a job or trying to demonstrate to an examiner that you qualify for a certificate or rating, first impressions are important. Each Practical Test Standard has a checklist that applicants can use to ensure that they have all the materials required for their evaluation. It includes things like logbooks, aircraft documentation, charts, etc.

Each Practical Test Standard has a checklist that applicants can use to ensure that they have all the materials required for their evaluation. It includes things like logbooks, aircraft documentation, charts, etc.

Be on time: This shows planning, judgment and respect for the examiner’s time.

Be on time: This shows planning, judgment and respect for the examiner’s time.

Be organized: Have all the eligibility materials ready. For example, paper clip all the pilot documents together and tag all the inspections in the airplane maintenance records, as well as the endorsements in your pilot logbook.

Have the airplane ready and accessible: Complete the preflight well before the flight test and make sure that all fluids and equipment are checked. Small things like having the airplane parked as close as possible to the building and having it serviced and fueled show both professionalism and planning.

Demonstrate a "pilot-in-command attitude": From making the go/no-go decision concerning the weather, conducting of the pre-flight passenger briefing or determining any other safety of flight issue, the applicant is the pilot-in-command and that needs to be demonstrated loud and clear.

Few of us have satisfactorily completed a flight test without a couple of hiccups along the way. Demonstrating an exceptional attitude with above and beyond preparation can go a long way in helping the examiner make their final decision.


Better Sleep Hygiene is Easy*

Insomnia is often the result of poor sleep habits and making a few changes can help you get a better night’s sleep:

  • Avoid caffeine, nicotine and alcohol four to six hours before
    going to bed.
  • Exercise promotes restful sleep, but not if it’s too close
    to bed time.
  • Try to wake up at the same time every morning, even
    on weekends.
  • Don’t go to bed until you are sleepy; if you don’t fall asleep in
    15 to 20 minutes, get out of bed and do something relaxing.
  • Avoid napping during the day. If you do nap, do so for not
    more than thirty minutes during the mid-afternoon.

Source: UT Lifetime Health Letter

*For more information about maintaining good health on the ground and in the air, stay turned for the November issue of the American Flyers Newsletter.


Flying Without a Parachute

A man jumps out of an airplane with a parachute on his back. As he's falling, he realizes his chute is broken. He doesn't know anything about parachutes, but as the earth rapidly approaches, he realizes his options are limited; he takes off the parachute and tries to fix it himself on the way down. The wind is ripping past his face and he's dropping like a rock. At 5000 feet, another man goes shooting up past him. In desperation, the man with the chute looks up and yells, "Hey, do you know anything about parachutes?!"

another man goes shooting up past him. In desperation, the man with the chute looks up and yells, "Hey, do you know anything about parachutes?!"

Source: ahajokes.com

Ask the Pilot Professor
By Dr. Michael Bliss

Q: I have to make a flight into an airport I’ve never been to before and was wondering what I can do ahead of time to be more prepared for the flight?

A: Good question. I think there is a lot that can be done to prepare for this kind of flight. The obvious answer is to study the sectional chart, terminal chart if appropriate, the AF/D and one of the various airport guides that are available. Maybe not so obvious is to make a phone call to the airport ahead of time to obtain what boaters call local knowledge. Call an FBO or flight school and ask if there is an instructor you can speak to. Ask about entry procedures and reporting points. Ask what you can expect from the controllers. Ask where is the best place to park and where the cheapest fuel is. You might also find out where the best places to eat are found.

When thinking about where to park your airplane, decide if there is one side of the airport or other that is more convenient for access to rental cars, motels, etc. After finding yourself on the “wrong” side of the airport a few times you begin to pay more attention to the details.

The most important thing is to never be afraid to broaden your horizons. Do your homework and visit a new airport each time you fly. It will add to the fun of being a pilot.

Please send your questions to dr_bliss@af.tv

Aviation pilot professor

Calendar
Ground Schools & Events

Private October 3 November 7 December 5
Instrument October 24 November 28 December 26
Commercial October 10 November 14 December 12
CFI Revalidation October 18 November 22 December 20
CFI Academy October 9 November 6 December 11
CFIA & FOI October 24 November 28 December 26
CFII October 11 November 15 December 13
ATP October 4 November 8 December 6
BBQ/Seminar October 4 November 8 December 6

Back-to-Basics

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American Flyers Pilot Newsletter
Aviation Newsletter Staff

“You’re Invited …”
Join Us Saturday, October 4th, 2008 at 12:00 Noon For a Free Pilot Seminar & Lunch

October’s Topic is Weather Theory

Something that never changes is the challenge of predicting the ever-changing weather. Join us on Oct 4 for a guided discussion on Weather Theory.

Topics Include:

  • What goes into making safe go/no-go decisions
  • How to better understand and apply weather principles
  • Basic atmospheric theory
  • Avoiding hazardous conditions

Wingless Record Setting
By Joe La Valle

The HL-10 was one of five aircraft built in the Lifting Body Research Program. It was designed by NASA to evaluate the "inverted airfoil" lifting body and delta wing planform. It was flown 37 times during the lifting body research program and achieved both altitude and speed records for a lifting body aircraft. On Feb. 18, 1970, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag piloted the HL-10 to Mach 1.86 (1,228 mph). Nine days later, NASA pilot Bill Dana flew the vehicle to 90,030 feet, which became the highest altitude reached in the program. The lifting bodies normally carried enough fuel for about 100 seconds of powered flight and routinely reached altitudes of 50,000 to 80,000 feet and speeds above Mach 1.

Source: nasa.gov

Reminder:
The FAA will be holding three informal public meetings this month regarding plans to modify the Chicago Class B airspace area. Times and venues are as follows: Tuesday and Thursday September 23rd and 25th from 2:00 pm-7:00 pm at Signature Flight Center at Chicago Executive Airport, 1100 South Milwaukee Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090. And on Wednesday September 24th at DuPage Flight Center at Chicago DuPage Airport, 2700 International Drive, West Chicago, IL 60185. For more information, please contact Anne Hulsey, FAA Chicago TRACON, 1100 Bowes Road, Elgin, IL 60123; (847)-608-5524.

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… you can enjoy two hours of VFR or IFR simulator instruction, free, by attending either one of our weekend classes or taking an “IntroFlight”.

Get involved… introduce friends to flying. If you have a friend or acquaintance who might be interested in aviation send them in, or better yet, bring them! We fly 7 days a week.

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